Of theories and theoretical frameworks: hold your substantive theories lightly in iterative-inductive research

Note: the take-home message is at the end!!! 

Some of the participants on recent courses I have taught (for the SRA and for the Essex Summer School) have got me thinking about what I mean by the term iterative-inductive:

“This is a practice of doing research, informed by a sophisticated inductivism, in which data collection, analysis, and writing are not discrete phases but inextricably linked”.  (O’Reilly 2012, p.5).

As we know

“A deductive approach to research is one where a hypothesis is derived from existing theory and the empirical world is explored, and data collected, in order to test the truth or falsity of the hypothesis. A simplistically inductive approach to research is one where the researcher begins with as open a mind and as few preconceptions as possible, allowing theory to emerge from the data. A more sophisticated inductivism views theory as precursor, medium and outcome of ethnographic study and writing”. (ibid. p.29)

And we know that ethnographic research tends to be more inductive than deductive, to work hard to make ideas earn their way, to want to hear and sense the field, to learn from research participants, and to achieve a way of understanding that is meaningful.

Further, the notion of abduction (which may be a better way to understand iterative-inductive) recognises an on-going interaction between the researcher, the research field, and externally sourced and internally emergent (or created) ideas over a period of time and as part of the practice of research.

However, none of the approaches above adequately deals with the role of the literature review or the role of a theoretical framework in ethnographic research that wishes to be iterative inductive. As social science develops, transfers concepts to new settings, builds on prior understandings in given fields, it becomes more and more appropriate to consider extant (or external?) or pre-existing theories and concepts. Think of concepts such as institutional racism, stigma, theories of learning, cognitive dissonance theory, etc. Some of these have become almost common-sense terms in everyday parlance. No researcher can ignore what they already know. Furthermore PhD supervisors and colleagues often ask an ethnographer: ‘what is your theoretical framework?’ implying that they will have a toolkit of theories and concepts to pull out of a bag and use in the field.

As time has gone by, my own research has taken shape, developed, and built on previous ethnographic understandings to become something of a body of research on British abroad. I am increasingly using a practice theory (or structuration) theoretical framework, which shapes what I do and how I make sense of the worlds I inhabit. This theoretical framework is somewhat independent of the research, the field, and our iterative-inductive understandings. It is, for me, a starting point, but strangely it has come to me over time as an end-point, a reflection and reconsideration of earlier work. I use it to construct Practice Stories

“Practice stories pay attention to people’s feelings and emotions, their experiences and their free choices, but also to the wider constraints and opportunities within which they act. More than that, practice stories take account of how these different features of social life interact, and thereby how structures (like social classes, for example) get produced or reproduced. Theoretically, practice stories can draw from a wide range of social theory that comes under the description of structuration theory or practice theory”.

However, a practice theory framework does not exclude the use, application, or amendment of more substantive series that are created as part of the research or that are imported from previous studies. As I have argued in International Migration and Social Theory.

man in button up shirt

Photo by Khaled Reese on Pexels.com

So, perhaps a theoretical framework is actually more of a broad-brush all-encompassing approach to understanding wider aspects of human behaviour, while it is the more substantive theory and concepts that we wish to hold lightly (to quote one of the recent summer school participants, a design ethnographer), or use as sensitising concepts (to quote Herbert Blumer) in iterative-inductive ethnographic research.

 

 

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Essex Summer School inspires me again!

I’ve been teaching Ethnography at the Essex Summer School the past two weeks. It has been amazing. The participants have worked incredibly hard and have produced some wonderful research projects. I’m trying to think what it is about the summer school that is so warm and creative and makes the participants so enthusiastic. I think it might partly be that we are all there together for an intensive period of time. Also, everyone has chosen to come and already has a passion for the subject they have chosen. All I can say is that it is the best possible teaching experience. Imagine students that do all the reading that you ask them to do and more besides, students who work well beyond the classroom hours and have to be reminded to take a break, students who have a lot to contribute, who think, challenge, contradict, and bring their own experiences and insights so that as a teacher you are not only teaching but also learning. I have come home with a list of references to follow up, things I am excited to read, lots of ideas buzzing around my head, and an enthusiasm for my own work. Thank you to the especially enthusiastic and inspiring participants this year. You know who you are. And thank you to Mel and Jo and Dan, who support us all so well.

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Participants eagerly take part in an activity

Ethnographic Methods or Ethnography? The answer is in the eye of the beholder

9780415561815   Whenever I teach ethnographic methods someone asks me a question along the lines of: “I am not sure if I am doing a proper ethnography”. Or “I am not doing a full ethnography “.What they mean is that they are not going to spend a very long time doing participant observation, or they are not going to move in to an area and live with the people they want to learn about, or they don’t have time to spend much more than some portion of each day in the context, or perhaps the setting or group being studied is part-time itself.
This reveals, perhaps inadvertently, that people assume there is some kind of gold standard or accepted definition of what ethnography is or should be. But, I don’t know where this gold standard or accepted definition is held, shared, or defended.
Usually, it is in the eye of the beholder.
As I always tell students, there are no ethnography police or watchdogs, guarding standards. The people who will check whether your work qualifies as an ethnography will be journal editors, PhD examiners, publishers, and diverse readers of your work. Each of these will have different ideas of what counts as a full ethnography, and it will be them ( or some of them ) that you will need to satisfy. There is no single standard definition. My recommendation is that each of you working in this field decides for themselves what they consider being worthy of being called an ethnography, and be prepared to defend this in your writing. Explain to the reader what you did, when you spent time, who with, under what sorts of conditions, and – especially – why. What did participant observation add of value to your research? This is what is important, rather than deciding whether your work is an ethnography or not. It is not labels that matter, but practices.
If you want to use ethnographic methods but you are unsure as to whether you can call what you are doing ‘an ethnography’, then you could say you are using ethnographic methods or that you are informed by ethnographic methodology. This is why I have called my book Ethnographic Methods and not Ethnography.
There I argue thatEthnography should be informed by a theory of practice that: understands social life as the outcome of the interaction of structure and agency through the practice of everyday life; that examines social life as it unfolds, including looking at how people feel, in the context of their communities, and with some analysis of wider structures, over time; that also examines, reflexively, one’s own role in the construction of social life as ethnography unfolds; and that determines the methods to draw on and how to apply them as part of the ongoing, reflexive practice of ethnography”. 

The SRA in Edinburgh

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I spent a really lovely few days in Edinburgh recently providing training for The SRA. The courses were Designing Qualitative Research; Qualitative Interviewing; Conducting Focus Groups. All three courses were full up, with waiting lists, and the participants were fantastic – so much expertise and enthusiasm in one room! Some participants attended two or three days so we got to know each other well, and people made new friends. I tried using ‘play dough’ for the first time in the Focus Groups course. I think it went well – we had fun anyway. Participants came up with some interesting interpretations of un/healthy! We also learned that it might be better to get participants to shape their dough in groups rather than on their own, to avoid the pressure to perform, and the silence. It went very quiet while they sculpted seriously.

It is always lovely to have a few days in Edinburgh and meet up with old friends as well.

The British on the Costa del Sol Twenty Years on

I have published two new papers about British in Spain, and they are free to access! Indeed, readers may enjoy the entire special issue, all about British and Swedish living in Spain. Open Access

2017. O’Reilly, K. The British on the Costa Del Sol Twenty Years On: A story of liquids and sediments. Nordic Journal of Migration Research, 7(3), 139–147. Open access 

2017. Olsson, E., & O’Reilly, K. North-Europeans in Spain: Practices of Community in the Context of Migration, Mobility and Transnationalism. Nordic Journal of Migration Research, 7(3), 133–138. Open access

 

The Brexit Brits Abroad Project Web site is up and running

What does Brexit mean for the 1.2 million British citizens living in the EU27? 

BrExpats: freedom of movement, citizenship and Brexit in the Lives of Britons resident in the EU27  is an innovative sociological study  that questions what Brexit means for Britons resident in other European Union member states. Working closely with Britons living across the EU27, It keeps a finger on the pulse of how they experience Brexit and its impacts on their lives as it unfolds.

Have a look at the web site to read about our project, our participants, and our plans

How will Brexit affect expats? New study to examine impact of referendum on Brits abroad

A major new study is to examine the impact of Brexit on the lives of the estimated 1.2 million British citizens living in other European Union member states.

I am delighted to be working with Dr Michaela Benson on this prestigious project. BrExpats is one of 25 successful research projects taking place across UK as part of an Economic and Social Research Council’s project entitled The UK in a Changing Europe.

The study incorporates a Europe-wide panel of expert participants and research with Britons living in seven European Union countries, including extensive fieldwork in France and Spain, the two countries hosting the largest British populations in the EU. It will examine whether Brexit is likely to lead to a rise in return migration, and what the consequences of this might be for welfare and healthcare in the UK.

Citizens’ Panels. We will be looking for British living in Europe to be part of our ‘citizens’ panels’ as we proceed through these challenging times and the Brexit negotiations. If you are willing to share your stories, experiences, feelings, doubts, insecurities, and insights, by sending photos, videos, blog posts, short written pieces, or simply talking to us by Skype or email – in response to directives we send out as we go along, then please contact me

k.oreilly(at)lboro.ac.uk